QuakeCafe: A mobile wake-up call for Californians


12-15-2015

(Berkeley) - No one likes to be reminded that there's a 99.7% chance that California will experience a major earthquake in the next 30 years, but a little preparedness can go a long way [1]. A new mobile-friendly website uses six quick questions to show visitors how they compare with others and gather input on how California could become better prepared.

Launched today by the the CITRIS Connected Communities Initiative at UC Berkeley in collaboration with the Office of the Lt. Governor of California, QuakeCAFE works on all screens and takes less than two minutes to try. Just click "Begin" at quakecafe.org

"Earthquake preparedness is one of my top priorities," notes Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom. "QuakeCAFE is an exciting new way to help California become more prepared and resilient."

QuakeCAFE is web-based platform that combines peer-to-peer review with statistical models to streamline and structure public feedback.

"New visualizations and social media can be effective in building awareness without being boring or pedantic," said UC Berkeley Professor Ken Goldberg, who heads the project team.

QuakeCAFE emerged from the California Report Card (californiareportcard.org), an English and Spanish online platform that allows participants to assess government performance on timely policy issues and suggest issues for increased priority at the state level. Over 22,000 participants from all 58 counties have assigned over 40,000 grades and suggested over 500 issues for increased priority. Among these, disaster preparedness generated consistent interest across the State so Lt. Gov. Newsom encouraged CITRIS to develop QuakeCAFE.

Quake CAFE is a collaborative effort between the Connected Communities Initiative at the Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society (CITRIS), based at UC Berkeley and the Office of the Lieutenant Governor of California.

[1] Recent Earthquakes Near California, United States. Earthquake Track. 2015

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Contact: Prof. Ken Goldberg, University of California at Berkeley,

goldberg@berkeley.edu or (415) 722-5649